Career Advice

How to Write a Two Weeks Notice Letter + Templates

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How to Write a Two Weeks Notice Letter

How to write a Two Weeks Notice

How to Write a Two Weeks Notice Letter

According to statistics, approximately four million people in the United States quit their current jobs every month. There are many reasons people quit their jobs, from poor management, bad bosses, company culture issues, lack of appreciation for company culture, and occupational burnout. Regardless of why you want to resign, you need to give a two-week notice letter.

Most employers expect their employees to hand in a notice letter stating that they are formally resigning from the company. Writing a two-week notice is no easy task and is commonly described as a bittersweet experience. Whether you want to resign because you are unsatisfied with your current position or want to ensure a smooth transition into your new job at a different company, knowing how to write a two weeks notice is essential for several reasons. We’ll detail the benefits of sending a two weeks notice email and the common mistakes people make when drafting their own letter and provide customizable templates to use and submit to your employer to streamline the quitting process.

Understanding Why You Should Give a Two Weeks Notice Letter

In almost any employment contract, companies will state that you will be legally required to give a notice period of at least two weeks if you decide to resign. It is always in your best interest to submit resignation letters when leaving any job for a new job and follow your employment contracts in any new position.

Giving formal notice allows the hiring manager to fill your role with a new employee. It also promotes a smooth transition period during which you can handle any tasks and responsibilities or hand them over to the new employee.

In some cases, employees may feel the need to leave immediately if they have a job lined up, but it is essential to resign from your job and the company on a positive note by following notice period procedures. Additionally, while not standard practice, your current employer may allow you to use your vacation days to leave sooner than your two-week given notice period.

The Benefits of Submitting a Two Weeks Notice Letter

Providing a formal resignation can benefit you just as much as not providing one can be to your detriment. While two weeks is the bare minimum required, giving an extended period sometimes works in your best interest.

In rare cases, your current employer may decide to immediately terminate your employment; in this instance, you won't need a two-week notice letter.

It is important to ensure you submit a professional letter when submitting your formal resignation letter, whether through a face-to-face conversation or a resignation email. It is also important to use a friendly and professional tone when communicating to ensure a smooth transition from your current employer to your new employer.

Essentially, the top three benefits of writing and giving notice are:

  • Future Employment: Your future employment opportunities could be positively affected. For example, should a position you want open up and you apply and discover your ex-employer is the hiring manager, you'll be in a better position. Since you left on a positive note, this may secure an employment contract for you over other candidates.
  • References: The company may be a key reference that you need to secure any future new job opportunity. Many people don't realize the power a good reference holds. You're far more likely to secure better career positions with a glowing reference letter.
  • Good colleague relationships: Colleagues you’ve connected in your current position may aid you in unexpected ways if you encounter them in new positions if you leave on good terms. That is why it is important not to burn your bridges by leaving without putting in notice.

Three Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing a Resignation Letter

When resigning, it may seem like there are no mistakes to be made when writing a two-week notice letter. Unfortunately, this isn't the case. People make several mistakes while writing a two-week notice letter. We've discussed a few of these mistakes to help you avoid them and ensure your transition from your current job to your new job is easier.

Formatting Issues

Resignation letters need to follow a specific format. Typing a quick email saying, "I quit. Please accept this email as my official resignation," won't suffice as a professional two-week notice letter.

It is recommended that you always type your two weeks' notice in a Word document and convert it to PDF format when the letter has been completed. You should also always scan the letter for any grammar or spelling errors, as any small error could lead to misunderstandings and may come across as unprofessional.

Being Vague

Ensure that your two-week notice letters are always direct but brief. Don’t be vague or leave out the date your notice ends or begins, as this may cause a miscommunication between you and your current employer. You should also avoid mentioning your new job. Feeling pressured to explain why you're leaving for a new work opportunity is natural, but it isn't necessary and can do more harm than good.

Criticizing the company

Any career coach will tell you that criticizing the company you're leaving in your resignation letter is a big no-no. A two-week notice letter is not the time to air your grievances or detail how a company did not meet your expectations. This could lead to disciplinary actions being taken against you and affect your chances of receiving a good reference.

How To Write A Two Weeks Notice Resignation Letter

A person preparing to give two weeks notice

Now that you know what not to do when you write a two-week notice, how do you go about actually writing one? The letter's content and tone depend on your relationship dynamic with your employer. However, regardless of your feelings, it should always sound professional and direct.

Below, we have given three two weeks notice letter examples. Depending on your situation, any of these templates could serve as your two weeks notice letter. Feel free to copy and paste the template that fits your position and customize it accordingly.

A Simple Two Weeks Notice Template

Sometimes, it's best to keep a two-week notice letter simple, especially if you are not close with your manager or employer and don’t want to include a reason for your resignation.

Here is a good example and template of a simple two-week notice letter:


Current Date

Company Name

Company Street Address

City

State

Zip Code

Dear [Supervisor’s Name],

This is a written letter to inform you that my resignation from [Job Title] at [Company Name] will come into effect two weeks from today's date [Current Day and Date].

I would like to thank you for the opportunities that [Company Name] has provided during my tenure.

Please let me know if I can assist with anything you may require from me during this resignation notice period.

Thank you.

[Your Signature]

[Your Full Name]

A Formal Two Weeks Notice Template

A formal two-week notice letter places much emphasis on formality. A formal two weeks resignation letter is usually used when an employee has a very formal relationship with their current employer or manager.

Here is a good example and template of a formal two weeks notice letter:


Current Date

Company Name

Company Street Address

City

State

Zip Code

Dear [Supervisor’s Name],

Please accept this written document as my formal and official resignation from my current position as [Job Title] at [Company Name]. The effective dates are two weeks from today's date [Current Date] to [Current Date].

I appreciate all the opportunities provided to encourage my growth and development within my role at [Company Name], but I feel it is time to pursue new opportunities that better accommodate my current professional needs.

Thank you for all your support and guidance throughout my time at [Company Name]. My role as [Job Title] allowed me to gain unmatchable experience, and I am eternally grateful for that.

Please inform me of any way I can aid the company during this transition period. I wish you and the company all the best.

Sincerely,

[Your Signature]

[Your Full Name]

A Professional Two Weeks Notice Template

Writing a professional two weeks notice letter only slightly differs from a formal one. The difference is that a professional one focuses more on keeping a professional tone throughout while still showing appreciation to your employer. This is usually used when you have had a good relationship dynamic with your employer.


Current Date

Company Name

Company Street Address

City

State

Zip Code

Dear [Supervisor’s Name],

Please accept this letter as my official written resignation from my current position as [Position Name] at [Company Name]. It is effective two weeks from today [Current Date].

I want to express gratitude for how fortunate my time at [Company Name] has been, and I am grateful for all the opportunities provided to me to learn and grow within [The Company’s Industry]. Your support and guidance have equipped me with essential skills and experience I may never have gained otherwise.

I hope that there will be more opportunities to work and collaborate in the future.

If there is anything I can do to help ensure a smooth and easy transition period, please don’t hesitate to let me know.

It's been a pleasure working with you, and I wish you and the company the best in the future.

Sincerely,

[Your Signature]

[Your Full Name]


Delivering Your Two Weeks Notice

Writing a letter to give two weeks notice

When submitting your two weeks' notice, arranging a one-on-one meeting with your employer to discuss your resignation for courtesy's sake is important. It is also vital to formally submit an email resignation to ensure there is a clear paper trail of your resignation from the company.

In addition, some companies may require you to partake in an exit interview, so keep this in mind when providing your notice. These meetings or interviews should always be conducted professionally, politely, and gracefully to end your tenure positively and not burn bridges at your soon-to-be former company.

Moving Forward And Finding The Best Fit For Your Career

While starting a new job role can be exciting, leaving your current position can be an awful experience if not done correctly and professionally. Thus, a well-written exit letter is a simple act that can benefit your future employment opportunities and career.

If it is your first time writing a resignation letter, try keeping a two weeks notice letter template for future use. Alternatively, try keeping at least three two weeks notice templates on hand for various positions. You can use the templates we shared or create your own.

Armed with the information shared in this blog, you'll know the common mistakes to avoid and be better prepared to leave your current employer on a good note. However, if you're not quite sure about your next career, you can take our career test, which will help you pinpoint your exact strengths and the careers suited to your personality.

FAQs about Two Weeks Notice Letters

What Is An Exit Interview?

An exit interview is a formal meeting between a departing employee and their employer, typically conducted by HR. Its purpose is to understand the employee’s reasons for leaving, gather feedback about their experience at the company, and identify potential areas for organizational improvement. This feedback can help the company enhance its work environment, reduce turnover, and address any issues that may have contributed to the employee’s decision to resign.

What format should my resignation letters be in?

Your resignation letters should always be in PDF format. This ensures that the document remains unaltered and maintains its formatting when viewed on different devices. A PDF format also presents a professional appearance and reduces the risk of unintended edits.

Does a 2 week notice have to be exactly 2 weeks?

A two-week notice typically refers to the standard practice of informing your employer two weeks before your intended last day of work. However, it does not have to be exactly 14 days. It's generally acceptable to give notice that spans at least 10 business days, taking into account weekends and holidays. The main goal is to provide your employer with sufficient time to prepare for your departure. If you need to leave a few days earlier or later, it’s best to discuss this with your employer and come to a mutual agreement.

 


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